Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
CSPAN2 4
CSPAN 3
FBC 3
CNBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 15
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
the double-doubles. washington, our chief washington correspondent. you want to talk about the deficit. this will not go away. are people actually concerned about high deductibles? >> you certainly have a lot of republicans who will talk about it. there talking about the problems with healthcare.gov and they are also talking about the way the rubber meets the road. the prices that they are paying for premiums that are out there and the deductibles are going up as well. this is another talking point for them. they have criticized the health care law. we will have several members on capitol hill and this is one of the questions they will have to answer. rollout, theo the website is operating better. they will make this point over and over. >> lawmakers actually have a deadline of their own to sign up for the affordable care act. how is that going? >> there is actually a different website. technically, they are members of a small business. that is the congress of the united states. they are operating off of the d.c. exchange. the deadline is december 23. december 9 is the deadline for mem
for around the globe. >> president went on to say that a so-called deficit of opportunity, interesting phrasing there, is much more important than the fiscal deficit, the yearly fiscal deficit in this country which he points out is actually shrchging in his administration john. >> point out, this issue about the young people are disappointed with president and congress. >> part of the obama coalition that got him elected twice is young people, so-called millennials. folks at harvard has a unit that polled these folks. 18 to 25, bad news for the president, festival his approval rating down to 41%. that is a reflection of the population at large but down 11% since just this spring. and john earlier the president did some work to shore up the forecast, the so-called -- shore up the rveght affordable care a% of millennials disapprove of the affordable care act. have no plans to sign up. that's disappointing news. >> the numbers behind inequality could be surprising for many. jonathan betz has a closer look at what the president says is an economic inequality gap. >> simply put the poor are
by friday's deadline. the plan doesn't significantly reduce the deficit or, indeed, replace the sequester budget cuts. what does it do? we'll get into that a little bit later. >>> meanwhile, 203 jobs created last month. nonfarm payroll showed the jobless rate down to 7%. the better than expected numbers increase the speculation that the fed might stop. don smith joins us for more. don, very good morning to you. i see on a reuters survey there are now four that expect december or january, five in january. quite a significant move from the survey in october. what are your own thoughts? why wouldn't you go next week if you were the fed? >> well, exactly. there's still so much uncertainty in the market about will they or won't they. yet the market thinks at some point in the next few months it is inevidenceable. i think why not get the tapering out of the way, the announcement in december, even if it's a preannouncement to take effect from january. i think the bond market reaction to the pretty strong payroll report on friday taught us quite a lot, actually. we didn't see very significant sel
's infrastructure deficit. roads, bridges, transit systems are all increasingly at risk. we are facing an inadequate state of repair, construction of new facilities are on hold and we are losing ground in meeting our own needs, let alone the challenges of global competition. yet, this challenge is an opportunity for some potential progress. we know what to do to meet this challenge. we can write a new transportation bill that will meet today's needs. it just needs more money. there is a vast coalition that supports additional resources for infrastructure. the so-called special interests that are so often at odds are remarkably aligned when it comes time to recognize and fix this problem. business, labor, professional groups, local government, environmentalists, truckers, bicyclists all agree. the paralysis that surrounds questions of raising taxes does not necessarily need to apply in this case. ronald reagan, after all, was willing to sign into law a five cent gasoline tax increase 31 years ago when a nickel a gallon was real money. a user fee is in fact a different category from a general tax incr
anymore. we explored our countries trust deficit. robbie leatherwood will speak with us next. reporter: vice president aydin in asia, trying to keep the chinese are starting a military conflict. former army four-star general jack keane on what the administration should do next as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! ♪ [ male announcer ] the parking lot helps by letting us know who's coming. the carts keep everyone on the right track. the powerools iroduce themselves. all the bits and bulbs keep themselves stocked. and the doors even handle the checkout so we can work on that thing that's stuck in the thing. [ female announcer ] tod
't trust each other anymore. we explored our countries trust deficit. robbie leatherwood will speak with us next. reporter: vice president aydin in asia, trying to keep the chinese are starting a military conflict. former army four-star general jack keane on what the administration should do lou: let's take a look at the global hotspots that are not cooling. in afghanistan, president hamid karzai shutdown secretary john kerry's suggestion that the united states could rcumvent through famine have afghans defense ministers on a security agreement that would allow u.s. troops to stay in the country past next year. the spokesman of hamid karzai says he would not promote any of his ministers to sign in his place my certain demands are met, including a demand to change miliary operation. any major blow to hezbollah. one of its top military leaders gunned down outside of hishome in a busy beirut suburb. has bloke was quick to blame israel for the assassination and israel denied any involvement in the death of the terrorist. in the ukraine, more protest over closer ties with russia and reduction of
this taken me through a deficit of one penalty. and things around before the break when an airplane equalised with a grey and the like. when the then came from mike schools that will also sport from the penalty spot like the captain predicted that this was sent off for a second to none. the weekend results so far look like this got one for two against time about how spoke back to when it come but finds that last attempt a call sometime on sunday at the coast was well like take on britain. stay with us sunday champion. are you. the years. sure sweetie it. the team he was sixteen this keeps the second set nineteen ski team in each district to its gdp who graciously decided to start we didn't eat by the sea. i don't like effects. it tells its own pc the year. as the week starting ukraine was in the midst of its worst political crisis since the orange revolution almost a decade ago. demonstrators laid siege to government buildings. this issue the debate on the klitschko called for the resignation of president viktor you know cool pics. the latter's refusal to sign a pro europe act to restrict the
not propose any initiatives during his speech. but he said a rapidly growing of deficit opportunity is a bigger threat than the fiscal. we'll go to danny, professor of economics, great to have you back. >> thank you. >> a pleasure, you heard just a moment ago, america's dangerously growing income is defining the challenge of our time. is the president correct, or is he, as some would say, overstating the income inequality and wealth gap argument with that kind of a statement? >> no, if anything there is an understatement. he's absolutely correct saying that it is a defining problem. and this problem has just--it has been exacerbated by global pressures. it is an issue that the white house--i had an opportunity to attend a summit at the white house by the president's council with economic advisers. it is an issue that has to be addressed in light of what is taking place in the economy. >> let's drill down an a bit. we had a conversation before we went to air. as concerned as you are about income inyou quality, you're even more concerned about the wealth gap. >> if you look at income
a short problem. ist they ought to do now figure out a way to address that long-term deficit because it is rather painless in the immediate future. politicians, the future there will be nothing of significance that comes out of this deal. >> let's say they get a deal but lawmakers still push back. what does that say about what is happening in the sea -- in d.c.? >> if i was a good speller i would say it is his function. i don't spell very well. now the democrats -- and they need democratic votes to get this through the house -- the democrats are complaining federal workers having to pay their pensions. workers, someal of the republicans don't like the idea of replacing the sequester. they don't even like some of the user fees that are going to be imposed on airline passengers and customs. even the small stuff in today's climate draws a flag. do we need a clinton or christie in the white house? >> i'm not even sure the big c would do it right now. the parties are so divided. that is such polarization those in the middle get hit from both sides. we probably need to go through a crisis
for the footprint and recall that under the miso agreement they all showed a surplus but they also share the deficit. so if there's a regional deficit, the pain will be shared in terms of frankly rolling blackouts if it comes to that. we can hope for a cool summer in the summer of 2016, but that's not necessary a prudent approach. so with that i would be happy to answer any questions at the appropriate time. >> thank you, mr. moeller. our next witness is mr. john norris. you are recognized for five minutes. >> good morning, chairman whitfield, ranking member mcnerney, and members of the subcommittee. thank you calling this thing. and the opportunity to testify. as i acknowledged in a written test with their significant changes occurring on our energy landscape. the operation of our energy system in america has experienced in my view only modest incremental change over the last many decades. yet in recent years the rapid development of new technologies is bringing much more rapid change to the system. that change can be disruptive. i think embracing these changes will allow a much more efficient util
deficit representing 17% of total revenue and, therefore, having to go in a different direction when a lot of states were simply saying we're going to cut, cut, cut, actually realizing our gap was too big, it add to be a combination of the two, i went out on road, and i got beat up. but somebody had to explain what we were trying to do. and when it came to education, i did that as well. and there were a lot of people mad at me and, you know, folks spending a lot of money to try to defeat an organized effort at school reform even though they supported certain aspects of it, you know? it was the total picture that they didn't want to see happen. they might carve out a corner that they liked, but it was the total picture. somebody has to be the leader, somebody has to have the discussion, somebody has to bring the discussion to the communities, and somebody has to demonstrate to members of the legislature that, you know, you mean business, and you want to work with them, you want their input be, but you need to change direction. and i'll go back to this, you know, hartford be, new haven, brid
that will solve this problem. it doesn't have a lot of opposition, wouldn't add a dime to the deficit and congress should waste no time in enacting get. ashley: the problem is congress is embroiled in these budget battles that get pushed back two or three month. could this get lost in the shuffle as they deal with a bigger budget? >> we are hopeful that because this has such strong public support it has bipartisan support which is increasingly rare these days. we are hopeful that congress will take it up but it could get lost in the shuffle. ashley: this is a huge hit economy, any numbers over the last year 700,000 yorker's saved $330 million for this benefit. if they lose, that is money taken out of people's pockets and that has to hurt the economy. >> exactly right. this benefit is also good for businesses. people take transit to work save their employers through this tax benefit $300 million in 2010 alone. and letting just the transit portion of this benefit be cut in half, creates an unlevel playing field. if you are a business where a large number of your employees takes public transit to wor
were to continue, would lead to greater federal deficit, which would eventually reduce the nation's output in income, slightly what would occur under current law. so i believe we should be focused on how we get folks back to work. that is where the house has been focused. unfortunately, after 140-some bills we passed over to the senate, they still await even consideration at all by that body. so with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for his comment. we need to have the -- we don't have the time nor the inclination of going through the bills which the gentleman refers as jobs bills. of course we have an alternative and mr. van hollen will be talking about that in terms of jobs, investment, infrastructure, investment in education and growing jobs for our people. but the fact of the matter is, mr. speaker, there are 1.3 million people who can't find a job. to say that they will be disincentivized because we continue to give them some support so they can survive and their families can survive during the period of time that they're looking for a job, th
deficit. that has gotten lost in this discussion, the massive debt continues to not shrink and continues to pile up for future generations. host: would you support it, short-term deal for congressional resolution? guest: it would depend on what is in it. i think most conservatives would say, we have to do something about obamacare. we have to show the american people would think it is not working. perhaps that would be not allowing the sixth in the medicaid funding to continue to be sent generally to blue states. if we can maintain the sequester level the that is a minor victory. you mentioned the shut down. would you support that prospect if it came up again? guest: i didn't support the last one. there's no bill of a shutdown. when the president and senator reid said, give me everything i want or we will show the government down, we passed 14 bills while the senate has none. i think we blinked but it did draw attention to the failures of obamacare and the fact the president and the democrats -- they own obamacare. that is not the republican of the -- that is not the fault of the republi
group of symptoms which we call the the cognitiveoms, deficits. those are problems with memory and problems of attention. sadly, we do not have good treatments for those latter two categories. we have treatments for hallucinations and delusions, medications at work quite well. but the other parts of this syndrome, the parts that are often even more disabling, we need to come up with much better treatments. that is part of why nih is so focused on developing both better diagnostics and better therapeutics for these kinds of illnesses. host: this tweet on the issue of mental health -- are there any other significant development being made in other countries? guest: it is a great question. recently, mental disorder research has become global. there is a lot of interest in global mental health, and that is not just from europe and australia. canada and increasingly in other parts of the world. the disorders we're talking about our global and not unique to the developed world. as a result, there have been some very interesting little-resource environments to try to figure out how to
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)